Wednesday, March 30, 2016

Reportatio IV Now Available!

There is a new Scotus publication from Franciscan Institute Publications!

Now we have a working text of Reportatio IV from Oleg Bychkov and Trent Pomplun.

Publisher's description:

This book, gives the reader, both in Latin and in English translation, a solid working text of the Examined Report of the Paris Lecture of John Duns Scotus, known to scholars as Reportatio IV-A. 






9 comments:

Anonymous said...

And only $190!!!
*cough*

Lee Faber said...

Hey, but at least you get the whole of book IV for the price, not just six distinctions as is often common with the Vatican Edition.

Matthew Guertin said...

If only people cared...*sigh*.

Say, I seem to recall reading here that Scotus' line of argument for the existence of God in the de primo is basically culled from the Ordinatio. Would it also be found in this volume? Also, if one wants to do work on that bit of argumentation, is it more academically kosher to go to--wherever it is in the Ordinatio?

lee faber said...

Yes, Balic even gives a percentage somewhere. If you want the parallel passage, you would have to go to Reportatio I d. 2, ie. the first of the other two volumes published by FIP and ed./trans. by Wolter-Bychkov.

Depends on what you mean by Kosher. Few people seem to use the Wolter-Byckov edition, but since the official critical edition may never appear, and there are no critical reviews of Wolter-Bychkov, there are no academic grounds to reject it.

If I had time, I could transcribe the mss. for you, but here we are. Note that Wolter previously published the same text with Adams in Franciscan Studies.

Credo In Unum Deum said...

"Culled" might be too hasty a term. He spends a rather good chunk of time in De Primo explaining Essential Orders and drawing 16 very important conclusions. The argument which follows explicitly dispenses with the Ordinatio "actualist" start (which gives it the feel of a cosmological argument) and moves straightaway into the metaphysical argument for the Triple Primacy of the First Being. He then gathers a host of attributes the First Being necessarily possesses, including simplicity and unicity, two which are not included in the question on whether the God does in fact exist (unicity is proved in the very next question).
I like to look at both the Ordinatio and De Primo proofs. They differ enough to be interesting separate reads. For instance, the Ord version has 7 proofs for unicity, but De Primo has only 5 and slightly altered in a place or two. Fun stuff nonetheless.

Lee Faber said...

Want to write something up for the blog, Credo?

If not, I understand; work for free, pearls before swine, etc.

Michael Sullivan said...

Yes, sadly I haven't been keeping up my end around here. Due to the need to find paying work, my love affair with scotism has lately become a long-distance relationship.

Credo In Unum Deum said...

Yeah.. I still need to come up with that article on the existence of God you asked me about some time ago. It seems that I should be able to spit it out pretty quick after that Symposium in North Bend we were at, but the publication version is running well over 30 pages, and that is too long for a "Fundamental Positions of Duns Scotus" posting. Much like Sullivan, my full time work being completely unrelated to Scotus or anything related to philosophy is somewhat a hindrance to doing that. My love affair is also a long-distance relationship. But the summer is coming. I should be able to spend time and whittle it down to post size for the blog. I'll send you the pre-pub version and we can discuss what needs to occur for the blog.

Nathanael said...

I don't know if you've mentioned this already on this blog but there's a new Scotus translation coming soon:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/0823270734/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1467932723&sr=8-1&pi=SY200_QL40&keywords=Medieval+Philosophy%3A+Texts+and+Studies&dpPl=1&dpID=41Pei23BRjL&ref=plSrch