Monday, February 15, 2016

New Grosseteste Edition

An important new edition of Grosseteste has come out, his commentary on pseudo-Dionysius' De caelesti hierarchia. Available here. For a cool 210,00 euro (!)

I've already added it to the notes of my edition of Petrus Thomae's De ente. (yes, Scotists read Grosseteste and ps.-Dionysius: Mayronis wrote commentaries on the Dionysian corpus).

This edition was begun in the 60's as a dissertation, and handed on to several generations of scholars being published only in 2015. What I found utterly shocking was the mention that McEvoy taught in a department of "Scholastic Philosophy", which eventually closed, perhaps in the 70's. Such bygone times I can't conceive of them, or even imagine what it would be like to be part of a mainstream movement (even if only in the Catholic world).

One nice thing about this edition is that they have retained the internal divisions of the text as it was read in the middle ages. Maybe this wasn't an issue since it is a medieval book. I'm thinking here of the Aristoteles Latinus and Avicenna Latinus editions, which do not report the medieval chapter and book divisions, only Bekker's. This makes it difficult to actually find anything with medieval citation practices (aside from sitting down and reading it straight through, of course). This I find stupid because scholars who work on Aristotle and Avicenna read their works in the original language and pay no attention to medieval translations. And rightly so. These editions are only going to be used by people working on medieval latin material, but the editors have made it more difficult for us on purpose! But, again, happily this is not the case for the volume under discussion here.

Anyway, buy this book and read it:

Corpus Christianorum


Corpus Christianorum Continuatio Mediaevalis (CCCM 268)

Robertus Grosseteste

Versio Caelestis Hierarchiae Pseudo-Dionysii Areopagitae cum scholiis ex Graeco sumptis necnon commentariis notulisque eiusdem Lincolniensis

D. A. Lawell (ed.)


XLII+330 p., 155 x 245 mm, 2015

ISBN: 978-2-503-55593-5

Languages: Latin, English

Hardback

The publication is available.

Retail price: EUR 210,00 excl. tax





Robert Grosseteste's translation of and commentary on the Celestial Hierarchy of Pseudo-Dionysius.


This volume contains Robert Grosseteste's translation of the Pseudo-Dionysius's Celestial Hierarchy. The Latin text is accompanied by Grosseteste's translation of the Greek scholia as well as his commentary and notes made on the Celestial Hierarchy and scholia. Grosseteste's work presents another insight into the renaissance of Dionysian studies which took place in the thirteenth century, as witnessed by commentators on the Areopagite such as Aquinas, Albert and Thomas Gallus. Grosseteste's commentary is greatly informed by his command of the Greek language which resulted in not only a detailed philological understanding of the Greek but also in a rich interpretation of the mind of Dionysius.


Declan Lawell is a Teacher of Latin in Liverpool. He has already published volumes by Thomas Gallus in the Corpus Christianorum Continuatio Mediaevalis series.

12 comments:

Matthew Guertin said...

Nah, that's just 210.00 euro. The Europeans do a weird thing, in that they use a comma in statements of monitory value where we would use a period. I was going to say, anyway: Is the niche market to which this item would be directed, and the need for it so great within that market, to justify seeling it for ?

Matthew Guertin said...

*Seeling it for thousands? (Html tag-use fail...)

Matthew Guertin said...

*Selling...

Matthew Guertin said...

Uh, weird. My first comment is no longer there...

Basically:

Nah, it's just 210.00 euro. The Europeans do a weird thing, in that they use a comma in statements of monetary value where we would use a period. I was going to say, anyway: Is the niche market to which this item would be directed so sizeable, and the need for it within this market so great, as to justify a price-tag of thousands?

Matthew Guertin said...

Uh, weird. My first comment is no longer there...

Basically:

Nah, it's just 210.00 euro. The Europeans do a weird thing, in that they use a comma in statements of monetary value where we would use a period. I was going to say, anyway: Is the niche market to which this item would be directed so sizeable, and the need for it within this market so great, as to justify a price-tag of thousands?

Lee Faber said...

ok, ok.

Matthew Guertin said...

That is so annoying. That was all a correction of a first comment, which apparently never got registered. Oi...

Basically:

Nah, it's only 210.00 euro. The Europeans do a weird thing, in that they use a comma in statements of monetary value where we would use a period. I was going to say anyway: Is the niche market to which such an item would be directed so sizeable, and the deman within this market so great, as to warrant a price tag of thousands?

Matthew Guertin said...

Oh my goodness...

Thomas Scotus said...

Hearing about a “Department of Scholastic Philosophy” might make the contemporary scholar of Scholastic philosophy drool with envy, but in actual fact the “Department of Scholastic Philosophy” at Queen’s University Belfast was a bit of a misnomer. (I think this is all mentioned in Anthony Kenny’s autobiography “A Path from Rome”, or perhaps in the second volume of his autobiography “A Life in Oxford”.) In the mid to late 20th century, Belfast was in the middle of a sectarian war, and the native Catholics, having been brutalized and discriminated against for hundreds of years, set up their own philosophy department at Queen’s University. The Department of Philosophy was the protestant department, whereas The Department of Scholastic Philosophy was the Catholic department. So the courses in The Department of Scholastic Philosophy included Wittgenstein, Russell, and analytic philosophy in general as well as Neo-Thomism. So you had two almost identical philosophy courses running in parallel (but one of them had scholastic philosophy on the course.) The departments were actually distinguished along religious lines, and the distinction lasted well into the 80s, if not the 90s. The great Grosseteste scholar James McEvoy himself was one of the few philosophers there who admired the Franciscan scholastic tradition. Queen’s still has quite a few enthusiastic Neo-Thomists in their philosophy department.

lee faber said...

Well, that's depressing.

James S. said...

I hate hearing about wonderful things like this - they make one feel physically (in the "worsened" sense) hungry. It is truly deplorable that so many mediaeval texts still exist only in manuscript. As of today, €210 = £164.83, which = $236.96.

Lee Faber said...

Well, they're going to stay that way with current library pricing. I am paying about 300 euros per manuscript for my Formalitates project. It used to be that one could get microfilms for a hundred bucks. But now it's all digital, and they make you pay through the nose.